The Pup’s Perspective: How Chevy became an emotional support animal

The+Pup%27s+Perspective%3A+How+Chevy+became+an+emotional+support+animal

The Pup's Perspective: How Chevy became an emotional support animal

MORGAN EDELMAN/ Staff Writer

This is the third article in a series about shelter dogs that have been adopted and found their forever home as told through their eyes. This series is part of a senior capstone project that is meant to raise awareness of the importance of pet adoption.

My name is Chevy, and I am a 4-month-old Hound mix. When I was born, I lived with my mom and siblings for a little while until one day, I was taken away from them and brought to a new home. Since I was just a baby, I had lots of energy and needed as much attention as I could get from my humans. I also had a problem chewing on things because I was teething and just wanted to relieve some of the pain. My family didn’t like that about me so they decided it was best to bring me to Habersham County Animal Care and Control. This place was very loud and scary, and there were so many dogs I had never met before. Luckily, I didn’t spend long in there because my new mom knew as soon as she saw me that she had to have me.

I have lived with my new mom for about three months and I couldn’t be happier. She takes me on so many adventures. I am still scared to be too far from my mom because I am afraid she is going to leave me just like my old family. My mom has benefitted from adopting me because I just became her emotional support animal. That means that I get to be with her all of the time. I make my mom happy and I have taught her how to be more responsible as well.

My favorite thing to do now is cuddle with my mom and go on long hikes. I have also found that chipmunks are my enemy, so I have to chase them all. Even though I was taken away from my real mom and siblings way too soon, I don’t mind anymore because I love my new human mom so much. Being able to help her in a way that no one else can is something very special to me.

Each year, there are approximately 3.9 million dogs that enter shelters and about 1.2 million of those dogs are euthanized. I was lucky enough to make it out alive but, unfortunately, not everyone has the same luck as me. Please take this into consideration the next time you are looking for a new best friend.