Oh the places you’ll go…

By LESLIE PRITCHETT

Staff Writer

It was the night before move-in day. I made sure everything is packed and ready to go for the morning. I checked everywhere to make sure nothing was being left. I stopped to think: Am I really going to college? 

I have been waiting for this day my whole life, but why am I not excited about it? I’m supposed to be because everyone else is, right? 

Life for me was about to change, and I wasn’t ready for it, at all. 

Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014 was the day. As I got ready, I tried to think about everything that was going to happen.

I was going to meet people I’ve never seen in my life and see people that were familiar from high school. 

My family and I packed two vehicles and headed to Demorest. The drive there seemed like it took forever. We arrived and started unloading. 

My parents turned my room into an atmosphere that felt like home. 

Reality hit when I had to tell my family goodbye. I literally had no clue what I was going to do without them. 

Piedmont did a good job of keeping the freshmen busy the first week here, but I was already counting down the days until I could go home again. 

Why am I not excited about this unfamiliar place that I’m supposed to call home? 

This question repeated itself in my head. 

The first couple of weeks of class were nerve-racking for me. I had no clue what to expect. Luckily, all of my teachers were great, and they convinced me the first day that they were there for me if I needed them. 

During my first semester, I experienced a case of shingles. The doctor said it was stress, definitely a word that describes me, so it made sense. 

I have a permanent scar that reminds me of that semester. 

I always question why it couldn’t have been somewhere else on my body other than my face, but that’s beside the point. 

That stress later turned into making the Dean’s List, which I was very thankful for. 

My second semester was much different from my first semester. I didn’t stress as much, but I also didn’t put forth the effort I should have. 

We all have regrets, right? 

I took 18 hours, and that was probably the worst mistake I’ve ever made. 

I did survive, and needless to say, I was so happy when summer rolled around. 

Over the past year, I have come to love Piedmont College and the people here. I have learned many things while living here:

Be prepared to wait in line on mac-and-cheese day in the caf. 

Walking is not always a bad idea, especially with how much a parking ticket is. 

A student worker paycheck is looked forward to every two weeks. 

The friendships developed will last a lifetime. 

A failing grade is not the end of the world, and there will be many more. 

Most importantly, the people here want us to succeed.